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PBS
Mar 15, 2013 11:00pm PDT
are a democrat or a republican. it doesn't care whether you're liberal or conservative. climate change will affect all americans no matter what your political beliefs, your religious beliefs, your race, class, creed, et cetera, okay. and in the end, the only way we're going to deal with this issue is if we come together as a country and have a serious conversation, not about is it real. but what can we do about it. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and pea
PBS
Mar 16, 2013 12:30am PDT
what is they have done and cuts they made and changes they have tried to accomplish in those very short eight months. that is what they are hoping the accreditation team does see that they have at least made a really good effort. >> how did they get into this mess? >> that is a point of conversation in the last eight months. when the accrediting team came last spring, they looked at what had happened six years ago. they have to take a look every six years at how the college is working. six years ago, they gave the college a couple of points to address and to change and to look at. essential essentially, they did not change them. they continued operating. when they came back last spring, nothing has been done and things were worse. >> if they had the recommendations, they were supposed to file six years ago and they never did it. have any heads been identified to roll? >> not that i know. they are looking at that. they are looking more to become one and move forward and address what has been given to them essentially and to become a cohesive college and serve the students that they need
PBS
Mar 2, 2013 12:00am PST
to these changes, and where is that resistance coming from? >> and initially when you look at the students, that was the initial push back. they were comfortable with the rules -- because they did not think where there were coming from. they saw as control. over time, they understood it was about the culture of the school. if you ask me about the resistance now, it is more external and internal. most of the resistance we have comes from the community. and there are a host of reasons why that happens. the charter movement in new orleans has been expensive. and in many ways, the community feels pushed out. a lot of the teachers who had taught in the community and from the community are no longer teachers there. from their vantage point, a lot of outsiders are coming in to run the schools. it creates some bank and animosity. -- some angst. tavis: i was working on a special called education under arrest. new orleans was one of the stops. so i spent a few days there. i heard a lot about this charter school movement in new orleans. and one of the rubs against charter schools is that they get to
PBS
Mar 21, 2013 12:00am PDT
changed faith in the course of their lives. 40% of americans are in interfaith marriages. we no longer take religious identity from their parents. what is going on, and they want answers. the answers are no longer just passed on from generation to generation. it is harder for people. if you force your own identity, it can be more personal. admit answering questions and adapting are different things. i get the answer to the question, but there are a lot of people troubled by the fact that religion will adapt itself to suit the needs of the people. those are different things. answering questions is one thing. adapting is another. >> i think what is happening is the home base of religion is shifting. the days when you would go to an pew andtion and sit in a fe someone would tell you how to live, that is inconsistent with the way people live their lives. what is the dominant way people live their lives. it is about searching. people still search. they have these questions. somebody is going to tell you the answer from a book and has not been touched for thousands of years? that is not cons
PBS
Mar 14, 2013 6:30pm PDT
, and is that behavior changing? is the flow of funds more into equities so far this year or not? >> it is, tyler. we're seeing more flows into equities this year which is a good trend. obviously, we've seen a cycle over the last four years, and that's really rocking the boat. and what we need to do is get people back to the middle. think about a diversifiy eied portfolio, we'll see people continue to buy as the population ages. we need to keep inflation in mind. equities are the only place that is really going to outpace inflation over long periods of time. and people investing in whether it's for accumulation or even income distribution, you need to be thinking about inflation when they think about their allocation to equities. >> brian, i want to ask you about we're all waiting for the s&p to hit its closing highs, just a few points away, for investors. and i guess for a market strategist, which is more important for you to see the strength of this rally? is it these new highs on 30 dow components or is it the s&p 500? >> it's really the s&p 500. for instance, we do not forecast 30 stocks. we fore
PBS
Mar 23, 2013 12:30am PDT
marriage licenses at city hall. a lot has changed. the shift is to the support for gay marriage. we have seen prominent republicans come out in support of it. how does that change your job next week before the supreme court? >> really, it doesn't and shouldn't effect what is a legal case that we are looking at interpretation of the u.s. constitution. things like public opinion polls and the political pressure that could be brought to bear really are not -- that's just not for a legal case like this. >> scott: you think the justices are more or less immune to that? >> i think the justices are used to being sucked into a political debate. their limited role as judges to interpret law. >> scott: what is the thing you and your team have to make sure the justices hear on tuesday? >> one of the most important things is the justices realize this is not just an issue of marriage, but states' rights and federalism. it would be unfortunate to have same-sex marriage imposed. marriage redefined for all 50 states by the intervention of the federal courts, thus, ending a debate that continues to go on
PBS
Mar 22, 2013 11:00pm PDT
need a culture change with the regulators. i talk about this a lot in my book. you've got a lot of good-will intentioned people, but they confuse bank profitability with bank safety and soundness. they're not the same thing. there's the right way and there's a wrong way to make money. they're almost aligning themselves to bank managers and wanting to have the appearance of profitability because they think that makes a sound banking system. it's really upside down. you can't ignore the problems here. some of that is overlooked. >> we thought we were going to get a culture change after the big crash. >> yeah, well, i think it's coming slowly but not fast enough. it's amazing that, you know, so many years after the crisis less than half of the dodd frank rules have been completed. a lot of them are watered down. >> by? >> well, the regulators have come to do this. some of the provisions in dodd frank had too many provisions, but we get more exceptions when these proposals come out such as the volcker rule. we get these rules that are hard to enforce and easy to game. >> when dodd frank and
PBS
Mar 27, 2013 12:00am PDT
believed music can change lives for the better as part of the iconic group, peter paul & mary. they were there 50 years ago for the march on washington. they put together a concert for sandy hook elementary survivors, teachers. he has a new album called "i'm in love with a big blue frog." let's take a look at peter paul & mary singing at their 20th anniversary concert. i'm in love with the big blue frog ♪ ♪ paul was here months ago and i have a great conversation with him as always. forever busy. the work does not stopped. the commitment is something we inherited. maryeavers, pete seeger, used to say if you seen, you have to lift me. the turning point came at the march on washington in 1953, and i remember when we were singing, people knew this song. it had been a big hit. us, andvis introduced he said, what should i say? a music groupr that will express music. we were not there to entertain. we were there to express and to join other people. get all of a sudden, a quarter million people were singing the song. ♪ if i had a hammer, i would hammer in the morning, i would hammer in th
PBS
Mar 8, 2013 6:30pm PST
the federal reserve is unlikely to change its easing monetary policy from this report alone. >> the question i think is more how many times months do you have to see to be convinced that is the underlying trend of job growth. if you have a long period at this kind of pace of course they would make some changes but really how sustainable is it and how are we going to be looking at this three or six months down the road. >> reporter: there were gains in construction and moving jobs, the service sector with retail education and health care leading the way added 179,000 jobs, but government employment dropped by 10,000, that could be a sign of things to come as the sequester spending cuts hit. overall, it's the third month in a row that job gains were above 200,000, but it brought back memories of last year when strong wintertime hiring only brought about a springtime swoon. for "nightly business report," steve liesman. >> that surprisingly good news about jobs is good news for all of us but is the turnaround taking place fast enough? i spoke with the chairman of the president's council of economi
PBS
Mar 8, 2013 12:00am PST
the said change. black is on the left, and white is on the right, now, this would get the i key response as opposed to the e, and now there is an blackface coming up, and i would just practice this task, and a new combined task, so there would be a bunch of these, and then along comes this, and the first time i saw this one, i was amazingly poor at performing this task. i had to give the same response to black faces and pleasant words with my left hand and white faces and unpleasant words with my right and, and whereas i was passed in the previous one, with the combined task, i was slow on this one. i could understand what. we may have one more, this may be the last one. this would get it. but the problem was, i later discovered, is that this is difficult for me because i must have in my head associations more of white with pleasant than black with pleasant, and that is how it turned out, how this became a measure of a strength of those associations. >> -- tavis: so how does it feel as a researcher, as a scientist to have to challenge, to come face-to-face with your own bias es. >> it wa
PBS
Mar 22, 2013 6:30pm PDT
haven't changed a lot. sentiment, however, has. we are seeing investors become more confident in equities. our clients will have to set up the time horizon and hit a portfolio that really meets the goal that they are trying to accomplish. >> i didn't hear you mention the word cyprus once in that first paragraph or two of your thinking. do you think that the worries over cyprus are overblown? >> it is very small. it is .2% of the e.u. forget the global markets. it is very, very small. cyprus has the potential to represent contagion. if cyprus like greece before, if that were to infect let's say spain or italy it would become an issue. if it doesn't it becomes localized. the big issue in cyprus that is troublesome is they have their version of the fdic which is deposit insurance. that is rule of law. if they were to break that for financing purposes that would be very, very different. cyprus when you compare that to the u.s. housing which is positive and may be offsetting in terms of what washington has taken away by tax increases and sequestration it is a small episode. >> let'
PBS
Mar 29, 2013 11:00pm PDT
wit from that position, this man, clarence gideon, has wrought a profound change in the course of american jurisprudence. >> gideon was a drifter with a criminal record, charged with breaking and entering and robbing a pool hall in florida. denied representation, he defended himself and was sentenced to five years in state prison. from his cell, he exercised his right to petition the supreme court for a fair hearing. when the justices ruled in gideon's favor, hundreds of prisoners who also had been denied their legal rights were freed or given new trials and our current system of public defenders was born. but 50 years later that system is floundering. when gideon v. wainwright was decided, fewer than half of all defendants were poor. now, over 80% are. of the 2.2 million inmates in the united states, more than 60% are members of racial and ethnic minorities, and the law puts a disproportionate number of them on death row. bryan stevenson found his calling defending the poor and least powerful among us. straight from harvard law school he went south, eventually to create the eq
PBS
Mar 2, 2013 12:30am PST
sort of show that the country has undergone a sea change in the years since prop 8 and since dome that it's now mainstream and acceptable for cautious political players like big corporations like the obama administration to come out in support of same-sex marriage? >> when you have companies like microsoft and goldman sachs, companies that aren't the new kid on the block like facebook or twitter. they're coming out and saying, you know, we have conservative people who work here, we have conservative customers all over the country, all over the world, and we are willing to say we openly support the rights of our employees to marry whomever they choose. that does tell me they're not concerned about the public relations of this because the public relations negative effects will not be enough to harm their business bottom line. i think that means a sea change. >> and that brief was really just one in a wave of briefs filed this week. the obama administration filed one supporting same-sex marriage. california attorney general pamela harris filed one. and also there was one by a number
PBS
Mar 19, 2013 6:30pm PDT
, fiscal follies in the united states. what did it take to change the fed's view of where the economy is, and specifically change its view of buying bonds or the level of interest rates? >> i think we'd have to see some dramatic changes in europe in the fiscal situation in the u.s. to make them feel comfortable. but there's less of that extreme risk that's going to hit. also we'd have to see a lot more data that the recovery in, for example, the labor market, has really taken root. you saw the green shoots before, a few months of more than 200,000 private sector jobs being created. but then, things kind of wilted. and never really took root. and the fed had to do more. i think they're going to be really wary of pulling the punch bowl away too early. they're going to want to make sure that those green shoots are firmly rooted and can probably withstand the chicago winter. >> randy, you talk about looking at the data, there is so much data that you can examine. for you, and especially as a former fed governor, what's the most important piece of data? is it the job market? >> i think it's e
PBS
Mar 12, 2013 6:30pm PDT
-day winning streak. >> and the unfriendly skies. how frequent flier programs are changing. fasten your seat belts and make sure you're locked in and upright for this. ♪ >> good evening and welcome to our public television viewers. after days of having the focus wall street, today it shifts to washington. >> it sure did, tyler. there's an escalating budget battle waging in the capital after house republicans unveiled their latest federal budget proposal today with plans to slash the country's massive deficit and get government spending under control all without raising taxes. as senate depp democrats prepare their own budget plan, can congress and the president reach a bipart san budget compromise any time soon in hampton pearson takes a look. >> house republicans unveiled the blueprint they say balances the federal budget with just spending cuts and no new tax hikes. at the top of the gop list of what's needed to achieve $4.6 trillion in spending cuts over the next decade is to repeal obama care, cut domestic programs from medicaid to college grants and require future medicare patients to
PBS
Mar 1, 2013 12:00am PST
and bonnie hammer have done a great job of trying to inspire some kind of awareness and change within our society. they have characters unite, which is about tearing down the walls of prejudice in tolars, racism, bullying, homophobia it and to realize that even though we are unique, we are very much the same. peer over the fence and tried to understand it. the last thing they tried to do last month was all i will not stand for. and that is getting people to say what it will not stand for. if you can create a dialogue with in a group of people, you can create change. a little effort, a little change of someone's mind can make a world of difference. tavis: speaking of collaborative working, back to you -- on "psych". whereas season 7 going to take us? >> season 7? first we find out whether henry. died henry. corbin bernson. a lot of people will be thrilled to see what the answer is. then we have our 100th at this. we did the cast of clue. martin mull, leslie and warren. and jeffrey tambour. and we have big show coming. we did a found for this episode about bigfoot. place the bigfoot charact
PBS
Mar 6, 2013 12:00am PST
that time which would, if different decisions had been made, what have radically changed the last 65 years in japan and in large part, all of asia would have been different. i was just really -- it was very i opening to me. i felt like, well, this is part of the end of world war ii that i know so little about and here is an opportunity to focus on just a couple of week period of time and some huge decisions that are made in a moment in history is a really shining moment for america. tavis: shining in what way? >> i think at the end of world war ii when this decision of how they were going to handle emperor hirohito, if you pull the u.s. population -- pullolle the u.s. population, people wanted him hung. there are different historians that have different takes. history has a different interesting way when you look back on it it can shift and change. so but i think the decisions made and ultimately what macarthur recommended to washington to keep hirohito in the emperorship to help rebuild japan, even after the way that america was attacked by japan and the hundreds of thousands of lives tha
PBS
Mar 7, 2013 12:00am PST
not changed in a while. even the public education is taxpayer funded, the taxpayers do not know what agency they have to fix it. you're doing what you're doing and we can argue about who was right and wrong. what agency to people have? >> that is a great question. this is to give road map to the everyday mom or dad who is educated -- frustrated by the education system. they often think it is hopeless. i call the school in a one returns my calls. this is the political black hole and we cannot fix it. there are things that everyday people can do. we have laws and policies in place that are created and protected by elected officials. and these elected officials, usually they vote for something in the committee. their constituents are not paying attention to evoke their having. nobody knows that. if we're able to shine a light on that and say, your state assemblymen voted against a lot to take sexual predators out of the classroom, what do you think about that? the vast majority would say that is a travesty. we should say, hold that person accountable for that vote and know when you're going to
PBS
Mar 13, 2013 12:00am PDT
is absolutely necessary, they are also saying, i want to change this world. that is the debate i find most interesting. sheryl sandberg's book is very important. women need to learn to lean back, recharge, renew ourselves. otherwise, this life is not sustainable, either at the individual or collective level. tavis: there are a lot of women who wanted the sheryl sandberg, a lot of people have entered into this rat race of corporate america and they want to escalate to the top. god bless them if that is what they want to do with their lives. is sheryl sandberg the kind of woman to advance a conversation about the role of women in america? >> the issue that she raises in her book are absolutely key. whether they are struggling to find a job or putting food on a table, or if they are running a big, multinational corporation. her point is that there are institutional barriers to success, but there are also personal, individual barriers to success, the voices in our heads that tell us we are not good enough. these are the voices that she is addressing in her book. she asks women to ask that ques
PBS
Mar 16, 2013 12:00am PDT
world. the author is give game changing steps. this is for everyone including students in classrooms. we are glad you could join us about the science of winning and losing, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> -- tavis the title pretty much says it all. "top dog: the science of winning and losing." cooperation is always better than competition, that risk is better than assessing risk. they also a lot to say about the way men and women approach competition, how kids are set up to fail as adults by the way they handle stress in school, and a training ground for how to succeed. lots to get to, which i can promise you we will not get to all of that in 30 minutes. it is such a provocativ
PBS
Mar 1, 2013 11:00pm PST
>>> this week on "moyers & company" -- >> evolution and climate change aren't scientifically controversial, but they are controversial to louisiana legislators. and basically everyone who looked at this law knew it was just a backdoor to sneak creationism into public school science classes. >>> and -- >> i never do debates about the existence of god. why would you do that? who are you going to convince? i like to talk about public issues. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to buil
PBS
Mar 9, 2013 12:30am PST
. when you have a shock to the system like this, is this likely to change the way policing is done in santa cruz now? >> sure. i mean, we're a town where, and i think paul would agree, where you don't want the police showing up to ask your side of the story in a misdemeanor accusation. you don't want them pounding on the door with guns drawn in bulletproof vests. there's no way the 92 remaining officers on that force are going to be taking such a casual, such a friendly approach. they can't. it's bound to change the way everybody in that town -- >> first time in 150 years that any officers have been killed in the line of duty in that town. >> let's be clear, part of the narrative of how this story played out is this wave of crime that swept over santa cruz and this is the culmination of rising crime, rising crime. that's not really a fair perception to santa cruz. >> it's been a lazy kind of reporting often from out of town reporters. i lived there 24 years. i used to cover the santa cruz police department in the early '90s. there have been a couple high-profile crimes recently lik
PBS
Mar 15, 2013 6:30pm PDT
on tuesday. do you -- nobody is really expecting any significant change in policy. but do you expect any change in tone and conversation? and how might that impact investor confidence? >> i think today, again, i don't think they're going to make any real substantial change at this meeting. but you're already hearing a different tone among fed members copping out. you know, clearly the economy has gone from crisis in 2008 to now recovery. it might still be weaker than people want, but it's out of crisis. but federal reserve policy is still very crisis-like in aggressive and unconventional. and i think there is a big disconnect there. if the economy continues to improve, you're going to have more pressure coming on the fed to try to normalize its policy. and i think you're already hearing conversations. and you might hear more of that rhetoric next week. >> all right, jim paulson of wells capital management, thanks very much. coming up, we're going to look at some individual stock picks in our market monitor segment. >>> well, if you've been investing more money in your gas tank lately, yo
PBS
Mar 8, 2013 11:00pm PST
still in the mud. do you think he might have changed his mind about pushing forward if he had anticipated the death and the blood? >> i don't think so. i think that he believed so profoundly in democracy as an idea and so deeply that his oath to protect and preserve the constitution of the united states meant that secession was not to be allowed. he didn't believe the states had seceded. he believed that the states were still there and that these criminals who were in rebellion against the united states had taken over the apparatuses of the states. so it was a fight over who was going to control reconstruction as well as i think a philosophical, no, the constitution doesn't mention slavery and it doesn't mention secession. so whether or not it's permissible, you know, the way that you get out of the union once you're in is not something i think wisely that the founding fathers decided to, you know, address. and it left the question open, and lincoln's interpretation which i agree with is, you know, you can't opt out of civilization. you can't opt out of the social contract. an
PBS
Mar 11, 2013 6:30pm PDT
the day. >> shawn likes what he sees. >> it's nice. but honestly it doesn't change my day to day life. >> what are people doing about it? one sold some of his boeing stock and moved it to cash. another is concerned that a muni bond fund may be part of a bubble. >> i'm feeling pressure to move that money out of there. >> when we asked people on twitter what they're doing, most said they are checking them more often and a few are starting to make changes. >> contemplating dumping bonds but can't find a good alternative. moved half from equities to money market. got a bad feeling. but it was countered, adding more risk as long as big ben is here, so am i. >> advisors are being bombarded with questions about where to go from here. >> it's not about timing the market. it's about time in the market. >> in the meantime it's de ja vu all over again. back to the days when checking your 401k was something you looked forward to rather than dreaded. >> well the rise in stocks may have many americans feeling better about their portfolios. the ceo of general electric today warned that overregulatio
PBS
Mar 23, 2013 12:00am PDT
to make a racial change only on their terms, and if he talks about race, they get upset. -- he has to do is mention trayvon martin, people go ballistic. it's still drives our politics, are voting patterns, -- it still voting our politics, our patterns. it is still an important barometer of politics in the united states, but for that very reason, it is a gateway. if you are comfortable, and you get outside of yourself, and human progress, as they did in the 1960's, it -- and human progress, as they did in the 1960's, it goes beyond. as toare great lessons how citizens can organize to call on the patriotic heritage of the country to tackle our most intractable problems, and we need to do that again. tavis: i am glad you have said that. what other movements for justice and freedom and rights in this country have learned from the civil rights era? i have always seen the civil- rights era as the litmus test, my words, not yours, i have seen that as the high-water mark that other movements have taken their cues from, he it women, be it gays and lesbians, -- be it women, be it gays and lesbians
PBS
Mar 27, 2013 6:30pm PDT
their insurance alone. the big change will be small groups, they will have access to exchanges where their employees can now have a choice across a wide variety of health insurance plans. >> does the affordable care act ban lifetime maximum pay outs under plans and might that under the group setting raise premiums eventually? >> maybe a little bit. but again, it's interesting, the conversation tends to focus on the cost. let's step back and look at the big picture. we are saying that no longer will you be bankrupted because you get hit by a car stepping off the curb. in return, cost may go up a bit. that is a tradeoff we should be willing to make as a society. >> thank you for being with us. >> my pleasure. >> here is an interesting twist to the housing recovery that we have been talking about. pending home sales were weak because there were not enough homes on the market. these are contracts that were signed and not closed, they fell slightly more than expected. but the national association of realtors are saying that pending sales are near a three-year high. >> the nation's central
PBS
Mar 30, 2013 12:30am PDT
in children's pajamas ended up inside the children and change dna was a likely cancer-causing agent. it was banned from children's pajamas. we didn't know it was used in other products. in the last ten years, it has been the number one chemical in furniture foam in california today. >> by law, they are supposed to have these flame retardants, right? it is supposed to withstand exposure to candles without igniting. >> that's right. california is the only place in the world that has a standard saying the foam inside furniture will resist a candle flame. that leads to lots of chemicals in the furniture. it does not lead to an increase in fire safety. >> it doesn't? >> no. surprising. fabric is where fires start. there is nothing about the fabric. it says the foam inside will resist a small flame. if you drop a candle on the couch, the fabric burns. with flame retardants, it gives off a lot of toxic gasses. the flame retardants -- there is no benefit. >> the furniture industry defends the flame retardants. they say there has been a huge drop in deaths. 1,400 deaths in 1980. that is down
PBS
Feb 28, 2013 6:30pm PST
to grow, the latest showing on g.d.p. shows growth but just barely. >> susie: and a big management change at groupon: c.e.o. andrew mason is out at the daily deals site he co-founded. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: you know the economy is not very strong when analysts cheer because growth has been revised up by a "fraction," from a negative 0.10%. and with growth flat-lined, economists are wondering whether the upcoming budget cuts known as the "sequester" will derail the recovery. the good news is the cuts will take time to be felt. the bad news, as darren gersh reports, is the cuts will build in pain over time. >> reporter: in terms of its impact on the economy, the sequester is really more of a "slow" quester. the impact of the across the board spending cuts will take time to build and it could be months before its felt throughout the economy. students of government dysfunction say this is not the same as a government shut down or hitting the nation's borrowing limit. >> there is not that great an urgency. when we were talking about the debt ceiling, there was a r
PBS
Mar 1, 2013 6:30pm PST
back on investments, but retaining current consumption if you like. we have to change the mix there and maybe that will start to resonate out there with the american public and maybe then we'll be able to move forward with some sort of more reasonable fiscal path to the future. >> reporter: by easter, hoagland expects the sequester pain will probably be bad enough to force some sort of compromise, if not how bad is it going to be? what i'm hearing from a lot of people is the feeling this whole sequester thing is way overblown, is it? >> okay, play the washington number game with me for a minute. you heard the 2% number. "oh, it's only 2% of federal spending over the next 10 years. it's no big deal." but there's another washington number which is because of the way the sequester is structured, it's 10% to 13% in some programs this year. and that's going to cause some pain. >> susie: all right, well, talk us through this a little bit. i mean, you have said that the automatic spending cuts are going to be gradual. they officially kick in at midnight tonight. so talk us through wh
PBS
Mar 4, 2013 6:30pm PST
it might, you know, it might be the case that they're going to change that appetite for ever more reckless spending. and you noticed the concern economists have raised with this being unsustainable. they say ten years out, you're going to have an implosion if we don't change this course. this now begins to do that. i just wish we could reach an agreement where they're targeted like the legislation we passed over in the senate. >> right. >> we're still working to try to target the cuts. >> congressman, thank you very much for being with us this evening. >> thanks for the opportunity. >> appreciate it. coming up we take a look at things that are working and not working in the u.s. economy. in focus. the american recovery. now let's take a look at how the markets fared overseas this day. >>> as you probably noticed tonight is the beginning of a new chapter for "nightly business report" and i have a new partner tyler mathison and a new owner cnbc and we have a new set right here at cnbc headquarters in new jersey. but we will still bring you the same thing that "nightly business report" has be
PBS
Mar 6, 2013 6:30pm PST
in lower than expectations. the stock got slammed, down 7% to $12 and change. >>> an icon to dell, not so fast, financier carl icahn reportedly taking a 6% stake in the computer-maker dell. reports are that he doesn't really love founder michael dell's plan to team with a private equity firm and take the company private. icahn favors a different tact and has a different company, southeastern company management, another big dell shareholder so dell may be in play. dell posted gains for the day. >>> now, despite concerns about what the death of venezuelan president hugo chavez would mean to the energy market, crude oil closed lower, well off the session lows, rising after the federal reserve reported modest economic growth across the country. >>> and that brings us to the third installment of "nbr's" week long series called "in focus, the american recovery" and tonight we look at energy. here's sharon epperson. >> reporter: it was unthinkable a few years ago, but now u.s. energy independence appears to be within reach. the united states is virtually self-sufficient in natural gas supply and
PBS
Mar 13, 2013 6:30pm PDT
. >>> google announcing an executive change in its android division. andy reuben is stepping down. who's andy reuben? he's the guy who developed the android operating system now used on roughly two-thirds of all the world's smartphones. he's going to stay with google in a yet to be disclosed role. shares were down, closing at 825 and change. >>> amazon is trying to get more consumers to buy its large-screen kindle so it's cutting the price by $100, undercutting apple's ipad. the kindle fire, the hd version, with wireless capability will now start at $399. amazon shares gained slightly to $273. >>> well, a clear message to j.c. penney's investors from the top management today. their chief financial officer, ken hannah, told the conference he's not resigning and the same goes for ceo ron johnson. hannah said, quote, we're not going to run and hide. jcp shares rose for a while but remained unchanged at $15.65. they're down 20% so far this year. >>> the securities and exchange commission is allowing four of the biggest banks, citigroup, jm morgan chase, bank of america and morgan stanley to block
PBS
Mar 30, 2013 12:30pm PDT
on the ballot. question. how could the recommendations in the gop report change the playing field for the gop 2016 contenders looking ahead? >> well, one of the most important recommendations is the one aspect that the party really controls, which is the primary schedule. they're talking about changing the primary schedule in a way that really favors the more established candidates, and would hurt up and comers smaller candidates who need the primary system. >> i don't get it. why does the change do that? >> because if there are fewer primaries and fear debates, it favors those with the more money up-front. doesn't give as much time or as many opportunities to break out -- for breakout candidates like rick santorum. >> you mean more getting to know you time. >> exactly right. and the smaller primaries, the smaller caucuses favor candidates like santorum. in the next election will more likely favor a candidate like rand paul so they don't like this at all. rand paul is a real up and comer in the party but he divides the party. >> did rand paul make a mistake by saying, yes, he thought he would
PBS
Mar 20, 2013 12:00am PDT
ep was for adourn, has become the most life changing song in my career thus far. it was so exciting to watch people really connect with this video. andt the video out first, the anticipation kind of built up. tavis: there is a problem. there is something missing. >> when i was 8 years old recording songs or working all these years before i had a deal, i was not getting money. that is not the reason i make music. as a creative individual, i do this for my sanity. it is an inherent need. tavis: i love it. what has the success of being seen by 30 million people, how does that impact your career when you get to that moment? everybody is watching you, and you steal the show. >> i only knew i wanted to have a good time. i only wanted it to be everything i a imagined it to be. tavis: was it? >> it was more. we were right in the middle of the aisle. it was this moment of realization that it was related happening. i promise i was going to have a good time. haves been cool to want to artistic reach out and want to work. i suspect while this is miguel's first time on the program, it will not b
PBS
Mar 20, 2013 6:30pm PDT
report" with tyler matheson. >> no change. the federal reserve leaves interest rates where they are and stocks move higher. >> coming up, oracle and fed-ex, two corporates report disappointing earnings. >> and hot houses. more good news on housing sends home building stocks higher. we'll look at whether or not there's a thaw in the mortgage market as we continue our stream guide. all of that and more ahead. >> so, tyler, all about the federal reserve and the economy. >> and cyprus in there for good measure. it was a very busy news day. we're here to tell you all about it. the federal reserve did it again. says it's going to keep interest rates where they are, near 0%. and it also says it's going to keep up its bond-buying program. the markets like what they heard from the fed along with a pledge from the new head of japan central bank about its own bold, easing measures to be unvailed on thursday. as a result, stocks moved higher here about. the dow touching an all-time intraday high. the blue chips did close 56 higher. nasdaq up by 25 and the s&p 500 rose for the first tim
PBS
Mar 23, 2013 12:30pm PDT
, they refused, and i can say that with direct personal knowledge. whether this changes or not, we're going to find out. there are new players, particularly john kerry involved, and i think he will be very effective in that part of the world. >> has it been sufficiently noted that the president met with abu abbas, or sometimes called abu massa, the head of the palestinians? >> there's no problem. >> while he was there on this trip. >> well, however he meets with him, how many times -- >> it has been underplayed in the u.s. press? >> i'm sure it has been underplayed. >> was it a brief meeting? do you know anything about it? >> i do not. it was a very brief meeting but i don't know anything about it. i do know what the reaction was within the leadership of israel and i think they felt we finally have an environment in which we can talk constructively. >> talking about a two-state solution, there's some talk over there about a one-state solution. read the economist. one-state solution is a bad idea, correct? >> yes, i think it's a bad idea. >> should be two states. >> israel is never going to
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